The Miracles of Jesus – 2024 – Part 8

(I want to acknowledge the source of most of the material for these lessons is found in: The Miracles of Jesus Christ by Rick Renner. These video lessons can be found on Renner.org and on YouTube.)

John 21:25 NKJV And there are also many other things that Jesus did, which if they were written one by one, I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that would be written. Amen.

Jesus’s miracle ministry has never ended!

Hebrews 13:8 NKJV Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever.

What Jesus did, He still does!

As we study these miracles of Jesus, I want us to remember that Jesus WANTS to move on our behalf. All He is looking for is FAITH.

(I want to acknowledge the source of most of the material for these lessons is found in: The Miracles of Jesus Christ by Rick Renner. These video lessons can be found on Renner.org and on YouTube.)


Jesus Heals a Paralyzed Man Who Came Through the Roof

SCRIPTURES

Mark 2:1-12 KJV (1) And again he entered into Capernaum after some days; and it was noised that he was in the house. (2) And straightway many were gathered together, insomuch that there was no room to receive them, no, not so much as about the door: and he preached the word unto them. (3) And they come unto him, bringing one sick of the palsy, which was borne of four. (4) And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press, they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay. (5) When Jesus saw their faith, he said unto the sick of the palsy, Son, thy sins be forgiven thee. (6) But there were certain of the scribes sitting there, and reasoning in their hearts, (7) Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? who can forgive sins but God only? (8) And immediately when Jesus perceived in his spirit that they so reasoned within themselves, he said unto them, Why reason ye these things in your hearts? (9) Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and take up thy bed, and walk? (10) But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (he saith to the sick of the palsy,) (11) I say unto thee, Arise, and take up thy bed, and go thy way into thine house. (12) And immediately he arose, took up the bed, and went forth before them all; insomuch that they were all amazed, and glorified God, saying, We never saw it on this fashion.

GREEK WORDS
  1. “many” — πολλοὶ (polloi): a great quantity; something that is huge numerically
  2. “no room” — μηκέτι χωρεῖν (meketi chorein): no more space; no more room for receiving or holding something
  3. “preached” — ἐλάλει (elalei): to be speaking or talking
  4. “the word” — τὸν λόγον (ton logon): with a definite article, it is a reference to the Word of God
  5. “bringing” — φέρω (phero): to physically carry
  6. “sick of the palsy” — παραλυτικός (paralutikos): pictures one who suffers the effects of a stroke; paralyzed
  7. “[could not] come nigh unto” — προσφέρω (prosphero): in context, pictures an inability to draw physically near [to Jesus]
  8. “press” — ὄχλος (ochlus): a crowd, a mob, or a multitude
  9. “uncovered” — ἀποστεγάζω (apostegadzo): to remove a roof
  10. “broken up” — ἐξορύσσω (exorusso): to pluck out the eyes; to gouge out; to dig out; to dig through; to extract and remove
  11. “let down” — χαλάω (chalao): to let down from a higher place to a lower place
  12. “bed” — κράβαττος (krabattos): a bed, pallet, or mattress for the poor
  13. “saw” — ὁράω (horao): to behold; to delightfully view
  14. “forgiven” — ἀφίημι (aphiemi): to forgive; to permanently dismiss; to release; to let go; to irretrievably remove
  15. “blasphemies” — βλασφημέω (blasphemeo): pictures profane, foul, unclean language; language that is offensive (Mark 2:7)
  16. “perceived” — ἐπιγινώσκω (epiginosko): to know; to know a subject inside and out; to know from top to bottom; pictures a thorough and complete knowledge; first-hand knowledge
  17. “easier” — εὐκοπώτερον (eukopoteron): to do with nearly no effort; to accomplish effortlessly (Mark 2:9)
  18. “go thy way” — ὑπάγω (hupago): to go away under someone’s author­ity
  19. “immediately” — εὐθὺς (euthus): in that very instant; immediately
  20. “before” — ἔμπροσθεν (emprosthen): in the presence of; before the face; in the eyesight of; publicly
  21. “amazed” — ἐξίστημι (existemi): to be knocked out of one’s wits; to be “beside oneself ”; astonished, flabbergasted, overwhelmed, stupe­fied; to be speechless or at a total loss for words
SYNOPSIS

As we have seen in previous lessons, Peter lived in the city of Capernaum, and when Jesus was there, He stayed at Peter’s home. The ancient ruins of this site were noted by historians as early as the Fourth Century. The walls were still standing and the edifice had been converted in to a church, and it can still be seen today. It was in this house that Jesus performed countless miracles, including the healing of a paralyzed man who was brought to Jesus by his four friends.

Jesus Was Preaching the Word at Peter’s House

Mark 2:1 says, “And again he [Jesus] entered into Capernaum af­ter some days; and it was noised that he was in the house.” The news of Jesus arrival was “noised” all around the region. This word “noised” in the Greek refers to a big ruckus. In other words, everyone was talking about the fact that Jesus was in town. Specifically, He was in “the house,” which refers to Peter’s house.

Verse 2 says, “And straightway many were gathered together, insomuch that there was no room to receive them, no, not so much as about the door: and he preached the word unto them.” The word “straightway” in Greek means immediately; without delay. The moment people heard Jesus was at Peter’s house, “many” gathered to see Him. This word “many” is the Greek word polloi, and it describes a great quantity; something that is huge numerically. The crowd that gathered was so large, there was “no room” to fit everyone. The phrase “no room” indicates there was no more space; no more room for receiving or holding something.

Seizing the opportunity, Jesus “preached the word.” The Greek word for “preached” is elalei, which describes speaking or talking, and “the word” refers specifically to the Word of God. The use of a definite article here confirms this. Jesus didn’t yell or scream the Word at them; He simply began conversing with them from His heart about the Scriptures. As He preached the Word, the Holy Spirit confirmed the Word with signs and wonders.

A Paralyzed Man Was Placed Before Him

“And they come unto him, bringing one sick of the palsy, which was borne of four” (Mark 2:3). The word “bringing” is the Greek word phero, which means to physically carry. This man was physically carried to Jesus being “sick of the palsy.” The phrase “sick of the palsy” is the Greek word paralu­tikos, and it pictures one who suffers the effects of a stroke or is paralyzed.

The fact that this man was carried by four men implies that he was heavy. Normally, two could have handled such a task, but if he was a larger, heavier man, he would require more help. People who are paralyzed and bedridden usually don’t exercise, so they tend to gain weight from their seden­tary condition, as this man did.

Mark 2:4 says, “And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press, they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had bro­ken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay.” There are several things to note in this passage, starting with the phrase “could not come nigh unto.” This is the Greek word prosphero, and in context, it pictures an inability to draw physically near to Jesus.

Next, is the word “press” — the Greek word ochlus — and it describes a crowd, a mob, or a multitude. The mob of people that had filled Peter’s house was so great that the friends of the paralyzed man could not get him through the door to see Jesus. To overcome this challenge, “they uncovered the roof where he was.” The word “uncovered” in the Greek literally means they removed the roof.

The Scripture goes on to say, “…and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay.” This phrase “broken it up” tells us how they removed the roof. It is the Greek word exorusso, and it describes a very violent act. It means to pluck out the eyes; to gouge out; to dig out; to dig through; to extract and remove.

The four friends of the paralytic were so desperate to get him in front of Jesus that they dug through the clay and straw roof and made a hole large enough to let him down while he was still on his bed. The word “bed” is the Greek word krabattos, and it describes a bed, pallet, or mattress for the poor. It was the place on which this sick man had been fixated and was living his life.

Jesus Saw and Was Moved by Their Faith

Mark 2:5 says, “When Jesus saw their faith, he said unto the sick of the palsy, Son, thy sins be forgiven thee.” The word “saw” is the Greek word horao, which means to behold or to delightfully view. How did Jesus see their faith? He saw it in their actions. They believed so strongly that Jesus could heal their paralyzed friend that they gouged a hole in the roof and lowered their friend down in front of Him.

The intensity of their faith impressed Jesus and moved Him to say, “Son, thy sins be forgiven thee.” The word “forgiven” is from the Greek word aphiemi, which means to permanently dismiss; to release; to let go; to irretriev­ably remove. Jesus permanently dismissed and removed the sick man’s sins, never to retrieve them again.

“But there were certain of the scribes sitting there, and reasoning in their hearts. Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? who can forgive sins but God only?” (Mark 2:6, 7). The word “blasphemies” here specifically re­fers to religiously foul language. The religious leaders were thinking to them­selves, How dare He say He has the power to forgive! Only God can forgive sins!

Verse 8 says, “And immediately when Jesus perceived in his spirit that they so reasoned within themselves, he said unto them, Why reason ye these things in your hearts?” The word “perceived” is the Greek word epiginosko, which means to know a subject inside and out; to know from top to bottom; it pictures a thorough and complete knowledge; firsthand knowledge. The thoughts of the religious leaders were not hidden from Jesus; He was totally aware of them, just as He is totally aware of our thoughts as well.

Jesus Demonstrated His Power and Authority To Heal
and Forgive Sins

Mindful of what they were thinking, Jesus turned to them and said, “Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and take up thy bed, and walk?” (Mark 2:9). The Greek word for “easier” is eukopoteron, and it means to do something with nearly no effort; to accomplish effortlessly. Thus, Jesus said, “It requires virtu­ally no effort for Me to forgive someone’s sin or to heal someone who is paralyzed. I have the power and authority and am well able to do both.”

Jesus went on to say, “But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (he saith to the sick of the palsy,) I say unto thee, Arise, and take up thy bed, and go thy way into thine house” (Mark 2:10, 11). The phrase “go thy way” is the Greek word hupago — a word that regularly appears with the telling of Jesus’ miracles. It means to go away under someone’s authority. Essentially, Jesus said, “I release you from your physical sickness; now go under the power and authority of My word.”

After Jesus uttered these words, Mark 2:12 says, “Immediately he arose, took up the bed, and went forth before them all; insomuch that they were all amazed, and glorified God, saying, We never saw it on this fashion.” The word “immediately” is the Greek word euthus, which means in that very instant; immediately. And the word “before” is the Greek word emprosthen, meaning in the presence of; before the face; in the eyesight of; publicly. When Jesus spoke the word of healing, instantly the paralyzed man was made whole before their very eyes and began to walk.

Scripture says that those who witnessed this miracle were “amazed,” which is the Greek word existemi, and it means to be knocked out of one’s wits; to be “besides oneself ”; to be astonished, flabbergasted, overwhelmed, stupefied, speech­less, or at a total loss for words. The people had never seen anything like this and didn’t know how to respond. All they could do was turn to one another and keep saying again and again, “We have never seen anything like this.”

The emphasis of this lesson:

Four men carried their paralyzed friend to Jesus to be healed. Motivat­ed by faith, they let nothing stand in their way — neither the crowds of people, nor the roof of Peter’s house. When Jesus saw their great faith, He miraculously healed the man and sent him on his way.

  • Jesus “saw their faith.” He actually saw their corresponding actions.

James 2:17 AMPC So also faith, if it does not have works (deeds and actions of obedience to back it up), by itself is destitute of power (inoperative, dead).

James 2:17 JB PHILLIPS “…Yet that is exactly what a bare faith without a corresponding life is like—useless and dead. If we only “have faith” a man could easily challenge us by saying, “you say that you have faith and I have merely good actions. Well, all you can do is to show me a faith without corresponding actions, but I can show you by my actions that I have faith as well.”

  • The four friends of the paralytic man had strong faith and did everything they could do to get their friend to Jesus. Be honest. How badly do you want God to move in your life? What evidence confirms your answer?
  • What are we doing to help people “get to Jesus” so they can receive from Him?
  • Jesus gave the paralyzed man His word of authority that he was healed. In obedience, the man acted on it and received his healing. What specific word of authority has the Lord given you regarding your situation? Have you obediently acted on it? If not, what is keeping you from doing so?